$\DeclareMathOperator{\p}{P}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\P}{P}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\c}{^C}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\or}{ or}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\and}{ and}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\var}{Var}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Var}{Var}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Std}{Std}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\E}{E}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\std}{Std}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Ber}{Bern}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Bin}{Bin}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Poi}{Poi}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Uni}{Uni}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Geo}{Geo}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\NegBin}{NegBin}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Beta}{Beta}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\Exp}{Exp}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\N}{N}$ $\DeclareMathOperator{\R}{\mathbb{R}}$ $\DeclareMathOperator*{\argmax}{arg\,max}$ $\newcommand{\d}{\, d}$

Thompson Sampling


Warning: This chapter is a stub. Come back later and hopefully someone has had a chance to finish it.

Let me present you with a seemingly simple problem that has a suprisingly complex solution. Imagine that you have two brand new drugs for a serious illness. You don't know how effective each drug is. You want to know which drug is the most effective, but at the same time, there are costs to exploration — there are high stakes.